Crazy Quilt Top

What to do with those curtains?
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Following the advice of Susan and others, I settled on Option #1: Just square them up and stitch them together.

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First, I picked out the hem and all edges, removing the hanging sleeve, which was not part of the pieced unit.

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Then, while ironing, I scanned for loose seams and holes.  I marked them with a pin as I found them.

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There were a few, but not too many, all things considered.  There is some fading, but not as much as you might expect, considering that they hung in windows for years.

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After considering options, I decided to mend them in the manner my grandmother probably would have, using a sort of darning type look.  We’ll all pretend it is decorative stitching, which belongs on a crazy quilt, right?! (Pretend, too, that the picture isn’t fuzzy.)

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Squaring up was where it got scary–I have to cut this?

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But, when there is no other way, one must do what needs to be done.  And it was worth it.  The seaming isn’t as obvious as I thought it would be.

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And the whole thing looks pretty good.

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My original estimate of “pieced in the 1960s or 1970s is probably wrong.  Looking at the fabric, I don’t see fabric that modern.  There is no polyester knit, which my grandmother was not shy about using in a quilt. It probably was more like the 1950s. My father doesn’t remember.

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This fabric has already been in service for a long time, but I do think it will be a good quilt.  Finished top is 83″ x 86″.  I hope to quilt it sometime in the next few weeks.

 

18 thoughts on “Crazy Quilt Top

  1. Well saved – it looks great. That little bunny fabric does look quite 50s-ish. I remember a lot of book/birthday card illustrations and the cute baby animals on cots were very much like that. Ahem. Old fogey that I am! 😉

  2. Deanna, very well done repair and I adore the finish.
    I have repaired so many of my mothers creations, mainly much loved pillows that she made from her massive crewel work stills, and other pillows made from her other massive embroidery skills. These of course took a beating. Many of them I turned into “mini” hanging quilts and used a lot of darning. It makes me so happy to look at them now. Gosh I miss her.

    Happy Friday Deanna.

  3. It is Fantastic!! so wonderful to get to look at all those different prints from another time. Great Upcycling!!! Happy Sewing from Iowa

  4. It worked beautifully! I was pretty sure the seaming would be practically invisible, and you did such a great job on it. This is a real treasure, and you’ve saved it.

  5. Wonderful quilt! Love seeing the old made new again! Pam Coughlin

    On Fri, Jun 21, 2019, 7:37 AM Wedding Dress Blue wrote:

    > weddingdressblue posted: “What to do with those curtains? Following the > advice of Susan and others, I settled on Option #1: Just square them up and > stitch them together. First, I picked out the hem and all edges, removing > the hanging sleeve, which was not part of the pieced u” >

  6. WOW, truly awesome…seriously impressed…good job!!!

    Warm regards, Stephanie Petrick

    On Fri, Jun 21, 2019, 4:39 AM Wedding Dress Blue wrote:

    > weddingdressblue posted: “What to do with those curtains? Following the > advice of Susan and others, I settled on Option #1: Just square them up and > stitch them together. First, I picked out the hem and all edges, removing > the hanging sleeve, which was not part of the pieced u” >

  7. Great save!! I think you solved all the challenges! Some of those crazy quilts had lace doilies stitched on and if you decide later your repairs don’t suit you; a doily might be the solution. It could go on “after” the quilting. 🙂

  8. Wow that looks fantastic! Love all the pretty colors and fabrics and the fabulous way they are all jumbled together in there. And how special that you are reviving something somebody else in the family made!

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