A Vintage Rescue

Sparkle Jane spotted it, wadded up in a pillowcase in a scrap bag. It sort of appeared at her shop, snuck in and left without a word. Many mysteries…

And she brought it to me. “Mom, you can do something with this.”

Well, I can try, but what is it?

It appeared to be a fairly large vintage flimsy that had most likely been washed. It was so tangled I couldn’t even flatten it out enough to see what it was.

So it sat for a while. But, while I was home with Covid, it became interesting. What is it really?

I started from a corner on the back. Trimming threads and fixing any popped seams that came up. By the time I was done (the picture is EARLY in the process) it looked like a fairly large long haired cat had taken up residence on the cutting table.

It was STILL too rough to really see, so I turned it over and started pressing. And pressing. And pressing. More than 2 hours of pressing

Sort of flat…

To the quilter. Who did an amazing job. A thick batting helped to absorb the waves in the blocks. SO much stitch-in-the-ditch. So much detail.

Finished

And now, it is the centerpiece of the guest bedroom. I look in every time I pass and feel great happiness that it is finally finished. I wish I knew who the original maker was. I would take it back to her and show her that her work was not wasted.

How old is it? There is no polyester in the top as far as I can tell. There is some original feedsack material. 1950s or maybe 1960s…

Scrappy Rescue: Coin Quilts

Next, arrange the 2-1/2″ x 4-1/2″ rectangles (or groups of rectangles) into sets of 15. This will create a larger strip 4-1/2″ x 30-1/2″.

Then stitch them together.

Only a few steps to go.

Using all possible previously sewn seams makes a difference. Each of those seams feels like a gift from another quilter. Quilts like this stitch us together as much as we stitch them together.

Scrappy Rescue: Coin Quilt(s)

Once I started working on the jelly roll leftovers, I realized there was enough to make TWO coin style baby quilts, plus some leftover for another idea.

So, I cut all the pieces I could into strips 4-1/2″ wide.

And set the leftovers aside to be cut into 2-1/2″ squares, or sets, where possible. Smaller pieces will be cut into 2″ and 1-1/2″ squares.

Using every bit practical (NOTE: I didn’t say “every bit possible” because I have my limit, and that limit, most of the time, is 1-1/2″. Everyone needs to choose their own limit, and it can change, but having a limit keeps things from getting out of control in a way that has you keeping fabric you will never use.).

Christmas Quilt

Inspired by a pattern called Sweet Dreams from McCall’s Quilting 2001, I started and finished this top in the past two weeks.

A good activity while I should be sleeping, and am not. For some reason I have been waking up about 4am nearly every day. I am not tired, and cannot lay there and feel crazy.

So I have been cutting and sewing. Fun times with the scraps.

It is about 68″ x 72″. Nice size throw.

ps–The pattern isn’t available online that I can find, but you might come across a copy of the magazine. It is the cover pattern. August 2001. Check Amazon and Etsy. I changed the borders.

Two Tiny Finishes

These two tiny quilts were stitched in the final days of 2020.

What a nice way to end the year.

This one was out of the cutest orphan blocks I have ever seen.

This one is a top I started years ago from a quiltalong at Temecula Quilt Company. They always have cute (little) ideas available.

Glad to have them finished!

Bali Batiks by Sparkle Jane

Sparkle Jane completed this beautiful quilt using batik scraps (thanks to Jennifer to held the giveaway).

She, too, enjoys quilts with a lot of different fabrics because of the interest and texture it creates.

And she made matching pillows using the cutoffs.

It is based on a pattern by Kim Brackett from one of her Scrap Basket books.