A Few Small Things

My current projects are a few baby quilts, part of the several I am making for my mother to have on hand.

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Here is a finished top, based on 4″ squares.

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And the back, to make the colors make more sense–I think it has a vintige-y, outdoors-y feeling.

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Here is the second one, or, rather, two of the nine blocks.

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They are part of this stack of pieces, intended to go with the backing of tools and construction equipment.

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And there are these little pieces of leftovers I am going to do something with.  Later on.

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And finally this one, which is just a pile of scraps and ideas at the moment, but it will involve cars when it is finished.

Baby quilts are fun because they are quick and low risk.  Even if you don’t find that you love an idea, it is easy to push towards a finish knowing that you won’t have to suffer very long.  And, sometimes, you discover something you really love and can do again later on a larger scale.

I hope to have all of these small things finished by the end of the month, at least to the flimsy stage.

 

Irish Stars: Check In

How is your Irish Stars quilt coming along?

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Mine is…coming…slowly.  But, I knew it would.  One does not finish 361 blocks in a day, or even a week, or even a year.  I am at 82 blocks, and loving every one of them.  It is very satisfying to see my small stack grow larger.

Anyway, please feel free to comment below or to send pictures (weddingdressblue at gmail dot com).  I will share all pictures received in a post early next week so we can continue to cheer each other on.

Remember:  NOT A RACE.  Just like-minded people sewing along together.

I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Sweet Sixteen: A FAIR Quilt

Sweet Sixteen was completed Sunday night and delivered to the local fair on Monday.

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We’ll see how they like it, but I LOVE it regardless.

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There are 1344 colored squares and nearly every one is unique.

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The quilting is mostly a simple cross hatch pattern, but with some flowers scattered here and there for surprises.

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The backing is as happy as the front.

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Yes, I love this quilt.  It was my 2016-early 2017 leader-ender.

Why Kaffe?

I have never sewn with Kaffe before.  Those who read my blog often are possibly wondering what happened.

Well, remember that we are redecorating.

Husband picked out throw rugs, curtains and a duvet set for winter.  This is not a picture of the actual rugs, but a similar one–ours have a strong chevron pattern, but close to the same color scheme.  “I like color,” he said.  Who knew?  After all, I have only been married to the man for 22 years.

My mother believes that my quilting has had an influence on him and slowly but surely drawn/pushed/led him in this direction.

Anyway, with all that luscious color, Kaffe fabric seemed appropriate, with some solids and white to give stability and organization.  All of this was scraps gradually accumulated from gifted bags over the years. I had sorted them with the vague idea of doing something someday.

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All blocks are complete–assembly follows.  And border decisions.

ps–The tutorial for the Irish Star blocks will be posted early next week.  This Kaffe quilt (known as O-Kaffe) has distracted me from verifying the measurements on the different size blocks.  I will have them done soon.  Promise.

 

Irish Star Quilt Along Part 3: Triple Irish Chain Block TUTORIAL

Welcome to The Irish Stars Quilt Along Part 3:  Triple Irish Chain Block.  If you are new or nearly new, you might want to check out the IRISH STARS QUILT ALONG tab for more information.  Don’t worry.  You aren’t late.  You got here right on time.  It is THAT kind of quilt along.

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The Triple Irish Chain block is just a  lot of squares.  It is the arrangement that makes all the difference.  Remember that this tutorial is for a single block.  Refer to Irish Star Quilt Along Part 2: Size and Scale to decide how many blocks you need to make for your quilt.  The number will vary between 4 and 180.  Yep, really!

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MATERIALS–FOR ONE BLOCK:

21 base squares 1-1/2, 2 or 2-1/2″

4 background squares to match the size above.

CONSTRUCTION:

  1. The only thing you HAVE to do in making this block is to make sure your background squares (white in my case) are correctly positioned:  in the CENTER position on each side.  DSC00576
  2. Grab 2 squares and sew them together.  You will do this a lot of times.  I keep my stack of squares to the right of my sewing machine in a little space where they are very handy but out of the way of my regular sewing.DSC00574
  3. I get asked how I make the decision of what to sew together.  Basically I try to keep good contrast between colors and not have the same fabric appear twice in a single block.  That is about as far as the “theory” goes.  Trust yourself and keep it lively.
  4. You will make 2 rows in the pattern: color, color, BACKGROUND, color, color. DSC00579
  5. You will make 1 row in the pattern: BACKGROUND, color, color, color, BACKGROUND.DSC00581
  6. You will make 2 rows of  color, color, color, color, color.DSC00585
  7. Lay them out in order as shown and sew together, nesting seam allowances in opposite directions.DSC00588
  8. Cut accurately. Press diligently.  Watch your seam allowance.  That is all that is really needed to be successful in working with small pieces. DSC00590
  9. Ta-dah!  You have completed a block.  Remember that your base square size determines the size of your block:  if 1-1/2″ then a 5-1/2″ block, if 2″ then 8″ block, if 2-1/2″ then a 10-1/2″” block. This is size-as-created including the seam allowance.  They will each be 1/2″ smaller when finished
  10. I am storing mine in a perfect size container.  It is very satisfying to watch them pile up.  The nice thing about scrappy leader-ender quilting is that it is practically FREE!  Other than the time to cut the squares, you are using thread you would have thrown away and fabric you would have thrown away. How worthwhile to make a quilt instead!DSC00592

Irish Stars Quilt Along Part 1: Basics and Preparation

Welcome to the Irish Stars Quilt Along!

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So many of you responded positively to the invitation to leader-ender-along with me that we are going to go ahead with it.  This will NOT be a traditional quilt along where we issue a specific step on a specific date.  Rather, we will all be producing blocks at a rate that suits our sewing style and our goal.  We’ll do it together for a while (time undetermined) until we have completed some quilts and it has served its purpose.

In order to prepare for this quilt along you should:

  1. Study up (or refresh your memory) on what a leader-ender quilt is.  As far as I know, Bonnie Hunter invented the term and still is considered the guru: http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/06/leaders-enders-whys-and-hows.html
  2. Decide on your base square size:  1-1/2″, 2″, 2-1/2″.  How to decide?  Well, what do you have the most of, either already cut or easily cut from your scraps?  That is how you will know.  We will NOT only use squares this size.  You will also need some background fabric (can also be scrappy, but should be in one color family and a good contrast to your base square color–I am using whites).  You will also need some fabric of other sizes for the stars.  Some have asked if the stars can be scrappy also.  Yes, they can, because anything can, but mine will not be.  I believe having the stars each made from a single fabric will help the eye to have a resting place.  You could even make all of your stars a single color–yellow, for example–and NOT use that color in your scrappy squares.  So many decisions.
  3. Gather your fabric and start cutting your scraps.  In the next few days I will post again with tips and suggestions for deciding on a goal size for your quilt.

Thank you for your enthusiasm.  Let’s get scrappy!

 

ps–My thanks to Susan for the great button–feel free to grab it and share on your blog or to invite others to participate.