Quick Quiltalong

Susan introduced me to Joy, of Days Filled With Joy, who is currently hosting a quiltalong.

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Yesterday I did steps 1 and 2.  Today 3 and 4.  I am not sure when the next one is coming, but if you already have 2-1/2″ squares, or can easily cut some, you might want to consider joining.

No, I don’t know what it will look like; it’s a mystery (ooo…oooo…spooky music).

No, I don’t know how big it will be; it’s a mystery (ooo…oooo…spooky music).

But, won’t it be fun to find out!

Another Star Kissed Quilt: 1-1/2″ Squares

Here is a second finishing idea for Star Kissed blocks.  This little quilt is blocks that are based on 1-1/2″ squares, but I can easily see it in any block size and as a large bed quilt.

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The sashing is the same width as the blocks and laid out in a scrappy-happy way.

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The quilting is a panto called Cotton Candy.

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The binding was a quandry; I almost went with white for the first time in my life, but found this polka dot in stash and it seemed to work.

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How are your Star Kissed blocks coming?  I am getting back to work on my 2″ based blocks this week.  I plan on doing a larger quilt out of them, with an additional setting idea for your consideration.  Sew On!

TUTORIAL: Star Kissed Big Block Baby Quilt

When a single block is 28″, it is easy to turn it into a baby quilt, wall hanging or table topper.

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BIG BLOCK BABY
Finished size: 36-1/2″ x  36-1/2″

MATERIALS

ONE Size Large (based on 2-1/2″ squares) Star Kissed Block.  It will measure 28-1/2″. You can find all directions HERE.

64 2-1/2″ scrappy squares
1/4 yard background fabric (NOTE:  I matched the background to the star block itself, but it is OK to use a scrappy background as long as it is very similar value.  Otherwise, the star won’t shine as bright)
1-1/8 yard backing fabric
batting
binding (NOTE that I matched the star points.  Not necessary, but I think is helps the quilt “work.”)

CUTTING DIRECTIONS

You may already have the 2-1/2″ squares. Cut from your scraps. Use mini charms, or 5″ charms cut into quarters. Leftover jelly roll pieces are good, too. Just get a good pile.

From background fabric you will need:
2 1-1/2″ x 28-1/2″
2 1-1/2″ x 30-1/2″
2 1-1/2″ x 35-1/2″
2 1-1/2″ x 36-1/2″

CONSTRUCTION

I thought I took pictures as I built this, but, if I did, I can’t find them.  So, this is really more just directions rather than a tutorial.

  1.  Attach the 1-1/2″ x 28-1/2″ strips to the sides of the block.
  2. Attach the 1-1/2″ x 30-1/2″ strips to the top and bottom of the block.
  3.  Sew 2-1/2″ squares together to form strips.  You need two strips of 15 squares each and two strips of 17 squares each.
  4.  Attach the 15 square strips to the sides of the block.
  5.  Attach the 17 square strops to the top and bottom of the block.
  6. Attach the 1-1/2″ x 35-1/2″ strips to the sides of the block.
  7. Attach the 1-1/2″ x 36-1/2″ strips to the top and bottom of the block.
  8.  Ta-dah!  You have a top.
  9. Sandwich backing, batting and top together and quilt.  I used a panto called Billowy.
  10.  Bind.  NOTE:  As mentioned above, a binding that matches the star points is a nice frame and ties the quilt together.

BIG BLOCK BABY Gallery

Claire created this beautiful version using soft colors and some wonderful custom quilting.

Your beautiful creation HERE…

 

Wedding Quilt #3 For 2020

This is the third wedding quilt I have completed for 2020.  What makes this the year of weddings?

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It isn’t fancy, but I hope the new family will enjoy cuddling on the couch.  When I don’t know people super well, and I want to surprise them, a couch quilt is better than a bed quilt.

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Scrappy of course.  Using THIS tutorial (Thanks, Cluck Cluck Sew).

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It is for a third grade teacher from my school.  May it bring them joy!

 

New Project: Black And Bright

There are some disadvantages to having a highly organized scrap system. One is that you can be struck in a moment with a new idea and immediately grab fabric and GO!

That is what happened with my new project:  Black and Bright.

I was looking at my blacks scrap bin, which overflowed.  (Several of the 2019 quilts had black in them, which had created an abundance of scraps.) And, pouf! An idea.

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Here it is in progress…more details coming soon.

Crazy Quilt Top

What to do with those curtains?
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Following the advice of Susan and others, I settled on Option #1: Just square them up and stitch them together.

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First, I picked out the hem and all edges, removing the hanging sleeve, which was not part of the pieced unit.

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Then, while ironing, I scanned for loose seams and holes.  I marked them with a pin as I found them.

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There were a few, but not too many, all things considered.  There is some fading, but not as much as you might expect, considering that they hung in windows for years.

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After considering options, I decided to mend them in the manner my grandmother probably would have, using a sort of darning type look.  We’ll all pretend it is decorative stitching, which belongs on a crazy quilt, right?! (Pretend, too, that the picture isn’t fuzzy.)

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Squaring up was where it got scary–I have to cut this?

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But, when there is no other way, one must do what needs to be done.  And it was worth it.  The seaming isn’t as obvious as I thought it would be.

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And the whole thing looks pretty good.

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My original estimate of “pieced in the 1960s or 1970s is probably wrong.  Looking at the fabric, I don’t see fabric that modern.  There is no polyester knit, which my grandmother was not shy about using in a quilt. It probably was more like the 1950s. My father doesn’t remember.

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This fabric has already been in service for a long time, but I do think it will be a good quilt.  Finished top is 83″ x 86″.  I hope to quilt it sometime in the next few weeks.