More Information On Charitable Quilt

I, too, was pleasantly STUNNED by the amount of money raised by the quilt/pillow set that was donated to a local charity.  I had set a reserve of $200, feeling that it should make that much or I would donate cash and give the quilt away.  Yes, giving away something people can’t afford to buy makes perfect sense to this quilter.

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My original understanding was that the format was a silent auction, but they did something different this year.  People attending the event (lunch or dinner) could purchase raffle tickets.  I think they were $1 each or 6/5$.  Then, they put the tickets in a jar by the item they were interested in.  If the jars (quart Mason jars) became full they were emptied into boxes in the back room.

People seemed very willing to spend one dollar, or even five dollars, to get a chance at something they wanted.  According to the event organizer, at the end of the evening $2140 was spent on raffle tickets and a very happy person got to take a quilt home.

As the maker of the quilt, I am thrilled.  While I was willing to make a donation, I could not possibly donate $2140.  But, you can bet I am already considering what I might be able to share next year. :)

If there are further questions, please let me know and I will try to answer them.  Maybe a format of this type would work in your area, too.

More Than Worth It

A while back I mentioned that I donated a quilt to a local charity.

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The results came back today:

$2140.

I’d say that was more than worth it.

TUTORIAL: Spool Shuffle Quilt

This quilt will use the narrowest strips of scraps you can’t bear to throw away.  Dig out that bag or box of skinnies and make a sewing treasure.

SPOOL SHUFFLE QUILT

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36″ x 36″

MATERIALS

scraps–some at least 1″ wide and 3-1/2″ long.  Get out that bag or box of skinnies

2/3 yard for spool bodies and binding (here brown)

1-1/2 yard background (here white)

1-1/8 yard backing

batting at least 40″ x 40″

CUTTING DIRECTIONS

1. Set aside a bunch of skinny scraps at least 3-1/2″ wide.  You might want to sort by color.   If you are cutting, 6 pieces 1″x 3-1/2″ will nearly exactly make the “thread” part of each block.

2. Set aside a bunch of skinny scraps 1″ wide.  Enough to make 130″ for the narrow colored border.

3. Cut 50 rectangles 1-1/2″x 4-1/2″ for the spool bodies.  They can be all one color, or, here I used two different browns to give subtle variation and interest.

4. From background cut: 100 squares 1-1/4″ x 1-1/4″ (stitch and flip on the spool bodies), 50 rectangles 1-1/4″ x 3-1/2″ (sides of the spools), 5 rectangles 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ (sashing), 25 rectangles 2-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ (sashing), 6 strips 1-1/2″ x 31-1/2″ (sashing), 2 strips 2-1/2″ x 32-1/2″ (outer border), 2 strips 2-1/2″ x 36-1/2″ (outer border).

CONSTRUCTION

1.  Let’s make the spool blocks first!  I sorted my scraps by color, deciding what the colors would be as I went along, but you could also do one to match your sewing room, or in significant colors for a special someone, or, and I really want to try this some day, a monochromatic one that shades from lightest to darkest scraps–wouldn’t that be striking?!

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The scraps need to be small strips at least 5-8″ wide and 3-1/2″ long.  I used mostly straight cut strips, but angled ones would give a desirable wonky effect.  I also settled on mostly strips about 1″ wide.  Six such strips make a good block.

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For each spool block you  will need your colored strips, two 1-1/2″x 4-1/2″ rectangles (brown), four squares 1-1/4″ x 1-1/4″ (background), two rectangles 1-1/4″ x 3-1/2″ (background).

2. Stitch together enough small strips to make a section at least 3-1/2″ x 3-1/2″.  I give a little extra wiggle room on the width because your ends might not match up exactly and this allows you to trim the block square.

3. Square up the block to 3″ wide by 3-1/2″ tall.  This will be the thread section of your spool block.

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4. Using a 1-1/2″x 4-1/2″ rectangle and two 1-1/4″ x 1-1/4″ squares, put the squares on the corners of the rectangle as shown, one on each end.

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5. Stitch along the diagonal

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6. Trim off the outer corners 1/4″ away from the stitching.

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7.  Iron open.

8. Repeat for the other half of your spool body.

9. Using two 1-1/4″ x 3-1/2″ rectangles and your colored spool body, stitch one rectangle to each side of the spool.  Press open.  Stitch the prepared spool ends made above to the top and bottom of the spool body.  Press open.

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10.  Ta-dah!  You have made a darling spool block.  It should be 4-1/2″ wide and 5-1/2″ tall.

11.  Repeat 25 times.  I had such a good time sorting fabric and playing with color.  If you look closely at the quilt you will see, for instance, that there are three green blocks, but they are different greens.  One  limey, one mossy and one more up-the-middle hunter green.  The blues are similar in their differences.  I enjoyed the challenge of matching-without-matching.  Enjoy yourself.  Quilting is supposed to be FUN!

12.  After you finish the blocks, have a really good time sorting and arranging all those beautiful gems.  Once you have a 5 x 5 arrangement that pleases you, it is time to join them up.

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13. Each row requires one  1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangle and five 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangles of background fabric.  These are your sashing.  Starting with the narrow background rectangle on the left, alternate background and blocks, ending with a wider piece of background on the right.

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14.  The next row should be the opposite layout.  Again you will need one  1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangle and five 2-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangles of background fabric, but this time start with a wide piece and end with a narrow one.  Alternate assembly order each row.  This is what makes the spools shuffle in the end. Hopefully the pictures help to make this step clear.  I am also open to suggestions.

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15.  Using the six strips of background 1-1/2″ x 31-1/2″, join the rows to assemble the top, with a strip top and bottom and between each row. I intentionally made these strips one long piece to further the offset appearance of the blocks.  More shuffle! You may, however, want to sew each time for the opposite direction to keep the entire top square and not distort it.

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16.  Time to make the scrappy border.  Using scraps 1″ wide and a few inches long, sew together enough to make two strips 1″ x 31-1/2″ and two strips 1″ x 32-1/2″.

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17.  Attach the two shorter pieces to the sides and the two longer pieces top and bottom.

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18.  Time for the final border.  Using the background strips 2-1/2″ x 32-1/2″ and  2-1/2″ x 36-1/2″, attach the shorter pieces to the sides and the longer pieces to the top and bottom.

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19. Ta-dah!  You have finished a Spool Shuffle Quilt.  Isn’t it darling!

ps–See that yellow “used” spool in the lower right?  It was my ugly orphan block.  I just recut the spool body and used it anyway. If you want to imitate the look, the body decreases to  2-1/2″ wide and the background strips increase to 1-1/2″ wide on that block.  Sneaky me!

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SPOOL SHUFFLE GALLERY

…your beautiful creation HERE!

Spools Top Complete

It isn’t very large and it isn’t very fancy, but it makes a quilter heart happy!

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The spools top is complete.

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Thanks to all of you who shared ideas on the border. After much debate, a single narrow border of scrap strips seemed best. I do like the result.

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I am working on the tutorial now. If you like what you see and want to try one too, get out your little scraps and start sorting colors. That was my favorite part of the quilt–just playing with fabric!

Quilt For Sale

The Oh My Stars quilt is looking for a new home.

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It is about 85″ x 90″.  Overall meander quilting.

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I am asking $800, plus shipping.

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If you or someone you  know is interested,  just drop me a line and we’ll work things out to get this quilt warming the right bed.

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Thanks so much.

Most Of A Top

The spools are sashed and joined up.

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I really like the way it looks so far.

Borders are next.  I am debating between a narrow border made with thin (1″)  scraps like the individual sections of the spools, OR an alternating border of small squares and background fabric, either a single row or two rows.  Both options would finish with  another border of background outside of it. I will probably bind it in brown.

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Suggestions?

Seeing Triple

Miriam sent along this picture of her THREE Fading Charms quilts.  Aren’t they terrific?!

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She said:

I started out making the large size of your Fading Charms pattern with the 2 1/2″ squares. I am a scrap quilter and had the squares already cut. While reading and rereading the directions I kept seeing the directions for the 2″ squares. I had that size squares already cut and ready to go so I made the middle size quilt with the 2″ squares. Of course I couldn’t leave out the small 1 1/2″ squares so that size was also made. Thought you might enjoy seeing all three sizes side by side (with the help of a few friends).

When Husband saw the picture he said that it looked like a meeting of QA (Quilters Anonymous) where someone fell off the wagon.  I thought that was funny, but it was even funnier when Miriam wrote back and said the pictures were taken at her Gammill Longarm Group.

Husband was pretty close on his guess.